After

Betrayal

 

 

 

war-symbol

 

 

I always thought I would wear that bracelet to my grave.

I thought about it for a moment and then

I heard myself say the words,

“Yeah that’s for sale.”

 

 

 

–Celia Farber

Comments

  1. Brother Strawberry says:

    Place no value or worth
    On betrayal and hurt
    Not a gem to be worn to the grave
    Relish knowing instead
    how priceless your work
    To the lives
    Like mine
    That you saved

    Give no value or worth
    To betrayal and hurt
    Nor to those who might cause you such woe
    Take comfort in knowing that truth will reveal
    And the haters will reap what they sow.

    Were I a poet
    Or even the writer I dream of being
    Perhaps I could find the words to convey
    More lyrically than rhyming verse
    How vital and priceless
    Is all that you have done
    For my life

    To simply thank you is nowhere near enough

  2. john powell says:

    That’s the most poetic, and the most mysterious, and the most alluringingly puzzling piece of haiku-ish verse I’ve ever heard from you.

    I find that there are at least two or three ways to interpret it. One of those interpretations could be correct, but all of them could be wrong.

    Rather than my transcribing of those possible interpretations, here, for you to then designate which one gets it right, the much more exquisite joy, here, will be to see YOU reveal and elaborate on the mystery’s ellusive translation of it’s poetic puzzle.

    Yes?

    • john powell says:

      post-op note: Yes, the word is alluringly, not alluringingly. No, I wasn’t feeling at liberty to boldly conjure a brave new word designed to impart emphasis by the use of unexpected, brain-tweeking, syllabic repetition. It was just a momentary lapse of mind-to-finger collaboration …which itself offers a variety of alluringly-puzzling routes of inquiry, no? 🙂

    • Celia Farber says:

      John,

      The title of the poem is Betrayal. A betrayal takes place long before. In the poem, the narrator is meeting the betrayal, becoming it. But it is not hers, no. It’s maybe a poem about how betrayal offers its own fruit. Tell me if that resonates or answers what you were wondering.

Speak Your Mind