Macron and Le Pen: At Least Know This

“At Least Know This,” was a concept my father and I hatched together about 20 years ago, but never “developed.”  I would (and still do) often ask my father–who I did not grow up with– sweeping questions, mostly about World War 2, which he began following closely by short wave radio as a boy in North Carolina, too young to serve. As I recall it, as soon as she said it: “At Least Know This,” we both knew it was a way to capture basic knowledge, and we thought to do a book with one page written by an expert on a variety of subjects: “World War 2: At Least Know This.” Or, “The Bolshevik Revolution: At Least Know This.”

I remember we agreed Peter Duesberg could write the chapter on virology. Neither of us can understand why the publishing industry has not beaten a path to our door.

In any case, last few days, I have brushed up my “at least know this” knowledge about the French election, and offer one article and one video, about Le Pen and Macron, respectively. One shocker, I suppose everybody but I already knew:

Did you know that Emmanuel Macron’s wife is 24 years his senior, and fell for him when he was her student, at the age of 15? Because they are globalists bankers, you are to view this as a “unique love story.”

I can hear my father say what he loves most to say about the French, in French:

“Ce n’est pas la fin des haricots”

(It’s not the end of string beans.)

But maybe it is. I may call my father tomorrow and say, “You know how you always say is not the end of string beans? Well, I just read something that might be.”

Meanwhile, I like this little video about Marine Le Pen’s voters, for the simple reason that it interviews actual LePen voters in the French countryside, who are part of the “forgotten France.” It’s basic man on the street journalism, which we see almost never in US media.
I have a feeling Macron will win. But Marine is very charismatic and powerful. She’s a populist, not “far-right,” though her father, who she kicked out of the party was.

Liam Scheff’s Exceptional Journalism: The Story That Almost Brought Down The HIV Murderers

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Liam Scheff has passed away, after a long battle with extreme nerve damage (tinnitus)–described here, leaving his many fans, readers, followers, and friends bereft. He’d been mourning the loss of the love of his life, Helen, for many years, who died suddenly in 2010.

I had, like many, recent exchanges with Liam, in which death was openly discussed, and I was fairly good about refraining from imposing useless or banal advice on my suffering friend. Nothing makes people feel more lonely than the feeling that the person they are addressing can’t quite hear what they are saying. Including when they are saying they are ready to die, because living is too excruciatingly painful. (Not psychically–physically, in this case.)

Liam addressed that in his farewell letter, linked above, so I don’t have to run the risk of a ham-fisted or cloying effort to represent it.

If I were to be dead, I would want somebody to bring up my best work.

Liam was both one of the most penetrating, fearless, investigative reporters of our time and one of the funniest YouTube satirists of fake science (I’ll post some of these later.)

He broke a story that was bigger, darker, more devastating, I think, than anything any of us ever broke (proved) before or since, on HIV/AIDS. It came to be known as “Guinea Pig Kids.”

I am a little unclear on whether it was 2002 or 2003 that Christine Maggiore first connected me with Liam Scheff, but when she did, it was because she had found out about a story that Liam then went after like a Tomahawk Missile–emerging with smoking gun evidence that got parlayed into several articles, got picked up by other reporters, and even became a BBC documentary.

Christine deserves the credit for making initial contact with the story, and Liam did the absolutely unparalleled penetrative, undercover investigative reporting that blew it wide open, locally, (here in New York City, nationally, and internationally.

In memory of Liam Scheff, I invite you to tread his original story, “Orphans On Trial,” published in NY Press, here.

And “The House That AIDS Built,” here: http://www.altheal.org/toxicity/house.htm

[Note: This was NY Press under Jeff Koyen, a very brave editor.]

You can read about how all hell broke loose here, and read the letter that temporarily caused the BBC to expunge the film from its archives, after industry bullies threatened and threw tantrums.

The film below is painful to watch. I worked on it as a researcher when Liam fell out with the producer, Jamie Doran, and I know everything in the film is true, sourced, and accurate.

If you have time for nothing else, watch this 25 minute BBC documentary, based on the original reporting by Liam Scheff.

You will find hard to believe, but it’s all true. And it all happened because of two remarkable people: Christine Maggiore, and Liam Scheff. May they both rest in peace, and hey guys–don’t squabble.

Send word. We miss you.

 

 

Wilhelm Reich: Alone

“This reaction of my closest friends and co-workers to the situation here is exactly the same that has harassed the human race for as much as we can say, 8.000 or 10.000 years, since patriarchy has ruled its destinies and since natural love was extinguished in the newborn infants. I shall not go into that. It is all written up in my publications. Whoever knows these publications also knows what that means. The discovery of the life energy would have been accomplished long ago, had this “I don’t want it, I fear it, I loathe it, I’ll kill it, I’ll flatten it out, I won’t let it exist- live, or exist”. If that had not been in their structures, not in their desires, not in their positive conscious wishes. They’re all descent and good people. No, it is in the structure. It is somehow in their tissues, in their blood. They cannot tolerate anything that has to do with orgone energy, or life energy, or what they call God, or what is their deepest longing for love fulfillment. They cannot tolerate it and they fear it. They fear it by way of structure. Their tissues, their blood cannot stretch out, cannot take it, evades it – avoids it and loathes it.

I do not say all this to depreciate their efforts, their honor, their loves, their lives. I say it because it is true, because it turns up in every single move, in every single word, in every single opinion, in every single paper, in every single thing they did to a- to whatever ever had to do with discovery – the discovery of genitality, life, love, such people as Laurence/Lawrence, or such philosophies as Giordano Bruno’s or such great lives as Jesus Christ, and so forth, and so forth. It is a sad, lonely chapter of the human race.

I don’t feel that I am obligated to solve this riddle, to do anything about it. I happened to discover the life energy. I happened to induce the ORANUR experiment. I know what it means for the future development of medicine and biology, philosophy and natural science and in this awareness I am completely alone.

There is no soul far and wide to talk to, to give one’s feelings – to let one’s feelings go freely, to speak like – as friends speak to each other.
This is all.”

–Wilhelm Reich,

1952

*Special Thanks to Tom DiFerdinando for discussions and knowledge.